Review

(Review) Jean-Marie Guyau, La Morale d’Epicure et ses rapports avec les doctrines contemporaines

Henry Sidgwick’s Review Mind, Vol. 4, No. 16 (Oct., 1879), pp. 582-587.   Guyau’s work is an enlarged edition of the first part of an essay on “La Morale Utilitaire,” to which a prize was awarded in 1874 by the Académie des Sciences Morales et Politiques. His view of Epicureanism is not, in the main, quite so novel as the reporter of the Académie seems to have supposed; but his book may be cordially recommended to students of ancient philosophy as containing not only the most ample and appreciative, but also—in spite of some errors and exaggerations—the most careful and

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(Review) Jean-Marie Guyau, Esquisse d’une morale sans obligation ni sanction

W. R. Sorley’s Review on Esquisse d’une Morale sans Obligation ni Sanction by Jean-Marie Guyau. Revue Philosophique de la France et de l’Étranger, T. 19 (janvier à juin 1885), pp. 319-328.   This is an interesting and valuable essay towards the establishment of a “scientific” ethics. The author, who is already favourably known for what he has done in recording the history of ethics, has now set himself to make material for that history.[1] He does not, indeed, break absolutely new ground, for Spencer, Simcox, Stephen and Höffding are among his predecessors. Yet he has ideas of his own, both

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(Review) Nietzsche, The Thinker.

Wilbur Marshall Urban’s Review[1]   Perhaps the most melancholy phase of the storm and stress through which the English-speaking peoples have been passing is the Nietzsche horror which seems to have taken possession of them body and soul. It was not so long ago that Mr. Gilbert Chesterton, with that finality which so easily besets him, told us that the ‘superman’ makes any discussion absurd into which he enters, and most of us were well pleased with this sign of robust English sense. We were told that art is the last refuge of the overman and, never having taken art

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(Review) George Santayana, Three Philosophical Poets: Lucretius, Dante, and Goethe.

Lane Cooper, The Philosophical Review, Vol. 20, No. 4 (Jul., 1911), pp. 443-444. This volume, the first in the series of Harvard Studies in Comparative Literature, contains the substance of six lectures which were delivered by Professor Santayana a year ago at Columbia University, and later at the University of Wisconsin, but which trace their

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(Review) Irwin Edman, Human Traits and their Social Significance.

H. B. Alexander, The Journal of Philosophy, Vol. 18, No. 22 (Oct. 27, 1921), pp. 609-612. This is a book designed to give to freshmen a conscious perspective of the multifarious nature of man. It sketches the activities and assembles the interests of a generic citizen of the century, first analyzing the operative modes of

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